refrigeration dehumidifier - principles of operation desiccant dehumidifier with pre-cooling - principles of operation
© Copyright    Humidity Control Systems Ltd    Tel: 0044 (0)1522 753722
desiccant dehumidifier - principles of operation
Desiccant Dehumidifier A desiccant dehumidifier operates on a totally different principle to a refrigerant type. The main benefit of a desiccant dehumidifier is that it performs exceptionally well when used in cooler climates, or when a low dewpoint is required. As there is no actual water produced during the process, these units can work effectively at sub-zero temperatures. The rotor (the heart of the dehumidifier), is manufactured from alternate layers of flat and corrugated sheets, impregnated with an active component (desiccant). It is made to form a vast number of axial air channels running parallel through the structure. As air passes through these channels, moisture is transferred between the air and the desiccant in its vapour form. The rotor is generally divided into two air zones which are separated by seals, the process sector (typically 75%), and the reactivation sector (typically 25%). The rotor is rotated slowly (approximately 8 to 12 rph) using a small geared drive motor. System air is pulled through the larger process sector where moisture is adsorbed from the air by the rotor material. The air leaves the dehumidifier warm and dry. Most of the heat gain is due to energy exchange during adsorption. A smaller heated air stream (usually fresh air) is pulled through the reactivation sector. This hot air is used to drive out moisture adsorbed into the rotor from the process air. The reactivation air leaves the rotor warm and wet. This air is normally exhausted to outside. As these two opposing airflows pass through the rotor simultaneously, a continuous and automatic dehumidification process is achieved. Drying capacity is normally controlled by regulation of the reactivation heater power.        System efficiency can be further improved by inclusion of a heat recovery or purge sector. This third sector preheats the incoming reactivation air by recovering heat from the rotor material prior to passing across the reactivation heater. Less energy is required for heating the reactivation air and the dry air produced is both drier and cooler than that achieved in traditional desiccant systems (see Recusorb).    
desiccant dehumidifier - principles of operation
Why Control Humidity? Why Control Humidity? Psychrometric Definitions Psychrometric Definitions Psychrometric Chart Psychrometric Chart Refrigeration or Desiccant Refrigeration or Desiccant Desiccant Principles Desiccant Principles Installation Examples Installation Examples Design Data UK & Eire Design Data UK & Eire The D-Max Silica Gel Rotor The D-Max Silica Gel Rotor
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World Leaders in Desiccant Dehumidification
refrigeration dehumidifier - principles of operation desiccant dehumidifier with pre-cooling - principles of operation desiccant dehumidifier - principles of operation
Desiccant Dehumidifier A desiccant dehumidifier operates on a totally different principle to a refrigerant type. The main benefit of a desiccant dehumidifier is that it performs exceptionally well when used in cooler climates, or when a low dewpoint is required. As there is no actual water produced during the process, these units can work effectively at sub-zero temperatures. The rotor (the heart of the dehumidifier), is manufactured from alternate layers of flat and corrugated sheets, impregnated with an active component (desiccant). It is made to form a vast number of axial air channels running parallel through the structure. As air passes through these channels, moisture is transferred between the air and the desiccant in its vapour form. The rotor is generally divided into two air zones which are separated by seals, the process sector (typically 75%), and the reactivation sector (typically 25%). The rotor is rotated slowly (approximately 8 to 12 rph) using a small geared drive motor. System air is pulled through the larger process sector where moisture is adsorbed from the air by the rotor material. The air leaves the dehumidifier warm and dry. Most of the heat gain is due to energy exchange during adsorption. A smaller heated air stream (usually fresh air) is pulled through the reactivation sector. This hot air is used to drive out moisture adsorbed into the rotor from the process air. The reactivation air leaves the rotor warm and wet. This air is normally exhausted to outside. As these two opposing airflows pass through the rotor simultaneously, a continuous and automatic dehumidification process is achieved. Drying capacity is normally controlled by regulation of the reactivation heater power.        System efficiency can be further improved by inclusion of a heat recovery or purge sector. This third sector preheats the incoming reactivation air by recovering heat from the rotor material prior to passing across the reactivation heater. Less energy is required for heating the reactivation air and the dry air produced is both drier and cooler than that achieved in traditional desiccant systems (see Recusorb).    
desiccant dehumidifier - principles of operation © Copyright    Humidity Control Systems Ltd, Lincoln, LN8 5AB    Tel: 0044 (0)1522 753722
Refrigeration or Desiccant Refrigeration or Desiccant
CALL US ON 01522 753722
World Leaders in Desiccant Dehumidification